SACRED MIRRORS

by Alex Grey

INNER TRADITION INTERNATIONAL

 
SACRED MIRRORS
SACRED MIRRORS

This unique series of paintings takes the viewer on a graphic, visionary journey through the physical, metaphysical, and spiritual anatomy of the self. From anatomically correct rendering of the body systems, Grey moves to the spiritual/energetic systems with such images as "Universal Mind Lattice," envisioning the sacred and esoteric symbolism of the body and the forces that define its living field of energy.

Includes essays on the significance of Grey's work by Ken Wilber, the eminent transpersonal psychologist, and by the noted New York art critic, Carlo McCormick.

"Grey's unique series of 21 life-sized paintings, the Sacred Mirrors, take the viewer on a journey toward their own divine nature by examining, in detail, the body, mind, and spirit. The Sacred Mirrors, present the physical and subtle anatomy of an individual in the context of cosmic, biological and technological evolution. Begun in 1979, the series took a period of ten years to complete. It was during this period that he developed his depictions of the human body that "x-ray" the multiple layers of reality, and reveal the interplay of anatomical and spiritual forces. After painting the Sacred Mirrors, he applied this multidimensional perspective to such archetypal human experiences as praying, meditation, kissing, copulating, pregnancy, birth, nursing and dying. Grey’s recent work has explored the subject of consciousness from the perspective of “universal beings” whose bodies are grids of fire, eyes and infinite galactic swirls." - www.alexgrey.com

 

THE WORKING THEORY OF LOVE

by Scott Hutchins

WILLIAM MORRIS ENDEAVOR ENTERTAINMENT LLC

 
THE WORKING THEORY OF LOVE
THE WORKING THEORY OF LOVE

Neill is in his mid-thirties, lives alone in San Francisco, and is growing weary of bachelorhood. On the brightside (relatively speaking) his deceased father left behind an empire of meticulously detailed journals chronicling every moment of every day,  and the acquisition of these journals by a widely respected pioneer of Artificial Intelligence gives Neill a chance to change careers and help turn his father's vast history into the first convincingly sentient computer.

Meanwhile, he thrashes around in a stalled romantic life. Eventually he stumbles forward into an uncertain romantic future with a twenty-year old high school student, but finds himself vexed by his unresolved feelings for his ex-wife.

In a nutshell, Neill’s a familiar-to-most-of-us mess. It's only as he dives into his father's journals and discovers a missing year that the relationship of his parents -- which up until then he'd viewed as a failed project -- comes into focus and gives him a new understanding of the mother he still has and the father he'd never understood. Only then can he begin to sift through the inscrutable tea leaves of his past and find the kind of love that had, for so long, been out of reach.

Fresh, highly original, and wise, Scott's debut novel tells the tale of a man reeling from his past and paralyzed by the prospect of a future. Moving and resonant, A WORKING THEORY OF LOVE is an odyssey into love, grief, reconciliation, and the tentative, cautious steps we take towards happiness when we allow ourselves to be vulnerable

THE GRIM COMPANY

by Luke Scull

AM HEATH & CO

 
THE GRIM COMPANY
THE GRIM COMPANY

Five hundred years ago, the world was sundered in the celestial Godswar. Seeking to throw off the shackles of the deities who created them, a cabal of mages and ancient loremasters rose up and made war upon the Gods. Though they won out, it was at a great cost: the ensuing cataclysm brought forth the Age of Ruin to the world, and the fallout of the disaster tainted the mages themselves.

Five hundred years later, the world limps on, fraying around the edges, seemingly winding down to an inevitable end. Into this blighted world, steps Davarus Cole, a hero - or, perhaps, a boy too young to really understand what being a hero means. Obsessed with notions of heroism and adventuring, Cole burns to do great deeds, while the men around him jeer at his boyish stupidity.

With the blackest sense of humour, THE GRIM COMPANY revels in the dark side, peopled by a grotesquerie of old men and anti-heroes: Eremul the Half-Mage, a sickly loremaster whose legs were amputated by the Magelord's decree; Three Fingers, a convicted rapist whose every appendage has been shortened by half, but who is, perhaps, the closest friend Davarus Cole will ever find; Barandas, the patient and morally-grey leader of the Magelord's elite guard, whose heart is kept pumping only at his master's whim; Yllandris, a sorceress from the frozen north, whose inability to massacre the children of her enemies might prove her downfall; and many more.

 

HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH: THE ECONOMICS OF THE GOOD LIFE

by Robert and Edward Skidelsky

PETERS FRASER AND DUNLOP LITERARY AGENCY

 
HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH: THE ECONOMICS OF THE GOOD LIFE
HOW MUCH IS ENOUGH: THE ECONOMICS OF THE GOOD LIFE

How Much Is Enough? is that rarity, a work of deep intelligence and ethical commitment accessible to all readers. It will be lauded, debated, cited, and criticized.

For this book, Robert Skidelsky is working with his son Edward Skidelsky – Edward is also an academic, but in the field of aesthetics and moral philosophy, as opposed to economics, and he writes for the New Statesman, Telegraph and Spectator. This book, therefore, is for a different, much wider market than Robert Skidelsky’s works on pure economics. Together, father and son are addressing some of the questions ordinary people the world over have been asking ourselves since the financial system crashed in 2008 – from a philosophical and economic perspective – such as what constitutes the good life? What is the true value of money? Why do we work such long hours merely to acquire greater wealth? In 1930 Keynes predicted that, within a century, per capita income would steadily rise, people’s basic needs would be met, and no one would have to work more than fifteen hours a week. Clearly, he was wrong: though income has increased as he envisioned, our wants have seemingly gone unsatisfied, and we continue to work long hours. The Skidelskys explain why Keynes was mistaken. Then, arguing from the premise that economics is a moral science, they trace the concept of the good life from Aristotle to the present and show how our lives over the last half century have strayed from that ideal. Finally, they issue a call to think anew about what really matters in our lives and how to attain it.